Tag Archives: St. Louis Post-Dispatch

My favorite roots-music CDs of 2013

By Barry Gilbert

It’s that time of year when I look back and think: Man, I dropped a lot of money on music this year. Again. So here’s my Top 10 list of the best roots music of 2013. Feel free to disagree. But keep in mind, these are the one’s that stuck among the albums I heard this year, and I didn’t hear anywhere close to everything. Nobody did.

And with 18 days remaining in the year, something great might slip into the mailbox before it’s over — like today, when Jimmer Podrasky’s “The Would-Be Plans” arrived. Can’t wait to dive into this long-overdue new work by the leader of the long-defunct Rave-Ups. Who knows, I might have to revise this list.

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Billy Gibbons Q&A: ZZ Top is still bad and nationwide

ZZ Top (from left): Frank Beard, Billy Gibbons and Dusty Hill
ZZ Top (from left): Frank Beard, Billy Gibbons and Dusty Hill

By Barry Gilbert

A chance to interview Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top? Hell, yeah.

Unfortunately, Gibbons is not crazy about doing phone interviews, so we had to settle for an email exchange. That’s good, because it sure is easier. But that’s bad, because there’s no give and take, followup questions or a chance to salvage unresponsive answers. (Not that Billy really did that.)

That little ol’ band from Texas has been on the road for 43 years, and that road was taking it to St. Louis on Aug. 24. A concert advance based on this interview for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch can be found here.

Following is our email exchange, with editing only for punctuation and clarity.

BG: I’m sure you get asked this every day, but here it is again: How is it possible for a band to be together for so long with no personnel changes, no breakups and reunions, no tabloid dirt dishing? How do you all handle conflict?

Gibbons: First, and foremost, we embrace the continual good time doing the ‘whatever’…! We like to keep on keepin’ on with, as we like to say, ‘the same three guys and the same three chords.’ Maybe it’s that we’re a trio as it’s an odd number (very odd in our case) so no ties in the case of a vote. We like playing and recording, so no reason to stop. OK, most bands break up and, inevitably, get back together, so if you’d like to think of the past 10, 20 or 30 years as a ‘reunion tour,’ feel free to do so.

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Dwight Yoakam’s generous Pageant show spans genres

Dwight Yoakam performs at the 42nd Annual Songwriters Hall of Fame Awards in New York on June 16, 2011. Associated Press file
Dwight Yoakam performs at the 42nd Annual Songwriters Hall of Fame Awards in New York on June 16, 2011. Associated Press file

August 19, 2013 12:53 pm

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! Magazine

To call Dwight Yoakam a country singer really doesn’t do him justice. If that were strictly true, Johnny Cash’s classic “Ring of Fire” wouldn’t have the sound and rhythms of T Rex’s classic “Bang a Gong” when played by Yoakam and his hard-rocking band.

As Yoakam told the Post-Dispatch in the days leading up to Sunday night’s concert at the Pageant, genre is something music marketers worry about, “but it’s not a boundary for musicians.”

And that was true throughout the generous 32-song, two-hour-plus show. “Trying” from last year’s “3 Pears” CD, rode on Jonathan Clark’s bass line and rhythm, which would be at home on many a Memphis soul record. Other songs took on a similar vibe with washes of organ by multi-instrumentalist Brian Whelan.

Another new song, “Rock It All Away,” was built on power chords any rock fan would love, and early Elvis Presley hovered over the stage during a cover of “Little Sister” and in the Jordanaires-like background vocals of “Always Late With Your Kisses.” (Missing was his rave-up cover of Elvis’ “Suspicious Minds.”)

Continue reading at stltoday.com

Dwight Yoakam Q&A: Guitars, Nudie Suits Etc. Etc.

Photo by Emily Joyce
Photo by Emily Joyce

By Barry Gilbert

Country music star Dwight Yoakam is spending the summer reconnecting with fans on a tour that takes him to a mix of venues, from theaters and festivals to state fairs and casinos. It’s a variety he appreciates, but he’s especially partial to festivals, having played Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days, Bonnaroo in Tennessee and Stagecoach in California, among others, already this year.

I caught up with him late last month while he was home in Los Angeles for one day, running errands and doing interviews before heading out on the road again. (I wrote an advance for his concert in St. Louis on Aug. 18 based on this conversation for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.)

We talked about a variety of subjects, from geeky guitar stuff to Western music fashion to the future of music distribution. But we started off with “3 Pears,” his latest album that came out last fall and landed him atop the Americana chart for eight straight weeks, a big change from his days as a hitmaker on mainstream Country radio.

Here is a transcript of that 44-minute interview, edited for length and clarity:

BG: Let’s start off with “3 Pears.” It’s been nine months, I guess? It was a smash on Americana …

DY: Yeah, it was an honor to have that kind of response to it, held the No. 1 spot for eight weeks on Americana radio. I was just elated. In some ways it felt like it was a full circle journey to have this album come out and be received on an alternative format, sort of like the first EP was when I began with “Guitars Cadillacs.”

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The Band Perry makes songwriting a group effort

(From left) Neil, Kimberly and Reid Perry, perform at the Boots and Hearts Canadian Country Music Festival, Saturday, August 3, 2013, at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in Bowmanville, Ontario.  The Canadian Press Images PHOTO/Boots and Hearts Music Festival
(From left) Neil, Kimberly and Reid Perry, perform at the Boots and Hearts Canadian Country Music Festival, Saturday, August 3, 2013, at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in Bowmanville, Ontario. The Canadian Press Images PHOTO/Boots and Hearts Music Festival

AUGUST 15, 2013 9:00 AM

BY BARRY GILBERT
SPECIAL TO GO! MAGAZINE

The sibling country group the Band Perry has had some dramatic successes, with five hit singles from its first two albums. Yet the song that has taken on a life of its own — “Pioneer,” the title track from the group’s sophomore release — is not one of the singles.

Lead singer Kimberly, 30, bassist Reid, 24, and mandolinist Neil, 23, finished the song with their friends the Henningsens, another family band (this one a father-daughter-son combo). But the song and the album had its birth on a hilltop in Santa Fe, N.M., where the trio stopped on a Nashville-to-California road trip.

They sat down, took out their guitars and started working through “the questions that were in our head at the time,” Neil Perry says, speaking with his brother and sister from a tour stop at Frontier Days in Cheyenne, Wyo. The Perrys and Rascal Flatts play Friday night at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater.

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Having a wild weekend: Dylan, Gangstagrass, Ian Anderson & more

By Barry Gilbert

We endured nine hours of traffic hell on our way to Chicago on Friday, a trip that should have taken six hours tops. Every time I was tempted to bail from the 5 mph-lanes of misery, I kept myself on track by repeating: “But we’re going to see Bob … we’re going to see Bob … we’re …”

Dylan’s unfortunately named AmericanaramA tour stopped at Toyota Park – and really, what more can be added irony-wise to a celebration of American roots music held in a suburban Chicago soccer stadium on a stage flanked by two giant pedestals topped by full-size vehicles made by a Japanese car company?

What we thought were great seats – field level, first section, stage right – weren’t so much, thanks to acres of standing room between us and the stage. That made it tough to see anything – and we were “close.” And there were no video screens.

Because we were two hours late, we missed the great Richard Thompson and My Morning Jacket, arriving during setup time for Wilco.

But Dylan was worth all the torture. Some people began to walk out after the third song, offended by the artist’s gravel-ravaged voice or not recognizing rearranged classics as well as the new songs – but, well, at this point what did they expect? The funny thing is, Dylan had more than a few moments when his voice veered toward the gentle – if not “Nashville Skyline” Dylan, then the expressive instrument displayed on “Tempest,” his newest album.

And keeping with Dylan’s penchant for expending no effort whatsoever to overtly please anybody, the majority of the songs in his 15-tune set were from the relatively recent past, leaning heavily on last year’s “Tempest” for gems such as “Duquesne Whistle” and “Early Roman Kings.” “Beyond Here Lies Nothin’,” from 2009’s “Together Through Life,” was a highlight, delivered with some edge and anger.

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Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson continues his story in Peabody Opera House show

Ian Anderson
Ian Anderson

July 15, 2013 12:10 pm

By Barry Gilbert
Special to the Post-Dispatch

Gerald Bostock, the fictional 8-year-old protagonist of Jethro Tull’s 1972 epic “Thick as a Brick,” is alive and — perhaps? — as well as can be expected 40 years later. Gerald’s creator, British rock flutist Ian Anderson, is doing splendidly, as he proved before ardent fans in a packed Peabody Opera House on Sunday night.

Anderson is touring behind the 40th anniversary of “Thick as a Brick,” a tour begun late last year after Anderson’s solo release of “Thick as a Brick 2.” The sequel imagines what might have happened to young Gerald after a scandal that befell him in Part 1. The rock opera is well-suited to the acoustics of the opera house, and praise goes to Anderson’s sound engineer, Mike Downs, and the Peabody tech staff for one of the best-sounding rock shows this concertgoer has ever heard.

Every nuance of the dynamic music was exquisitely presented, showcasing the virtuoso talents of Anderson, drummer Scott Hammond, guitarist Florian Ophale, bassist David Goodier and keyboardist John O’Hara (the latter two also members of recent Jethro Tull incarnations).

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Crenshaw, Bottle Rockets close a packed Twangfest

THIS STORY WAS PUBLISHED IN THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH ON JUNE 10, 2013, BUT WAS SEVERELY TRIMMED. THIS IS THE UNTRIMMED VERSION.

By Barry Gilbert

Singer-songwriter Marshall Crenshaw, backed by the muscle of St. Louis’ Bottle Rockets, on Saturday night (June 8, 2013) brought a sweat-drenched end to Twangfest, one of the most successful editions in the festival’s 17-year run.

Among the 13 acts that performed last week, three – Crenshaw, Asleep at the Wheel and Ray Wylie Hubbard – are bonafide music legends, and two more – Joe Pug and Todd Snider – may earn that status someday.

In addition, the four-night celebration of American roots music sold out three of the four shows (one at Plush and two at Blueberry Hill’s Duck Room), and set a record with fans buying 70 four-night passes. The festival ran smoothly, and even the technical gremlins took a year off.

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Dave Alvin lives to tell about his ‘Justified’ stint

Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin. Photo by Beth Herzhaft
Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin. Photo by Beth Herzhaft

May 31, 2013 6:00 am

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! magazine

Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin appeared on the tough, violent TV drama “Justified” and lived to talk about it.

“I consider that a great achievement,” Alvin says with a chuckle.

He guest-starred as himself, fronting a band in a bar. And it didn’t hurt that “Justified” creator Graham Yost is a big Alvin fan who wanted to use Alvin’s music in the show to represent the inner voice of the lead character, U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant).

Alvin, who plays Off Broadway on Friday, has had four songs featured in the FX series: “Harlan County Line,” which he sang in the barroom scene in Season 2; “Every Night About This Time,” from deep in Alvin’s catalog; “Beautiful City Across the River,” written for the show; and “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive,” a cover of a Darrell Scott song that closed the recent Season 4 finale.

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Son Volt frontman takes stock of his life with a memoir

Jay Farrar of Son Volt. Photo by Josh Cheuse
Jay Farrar of Son Volt. Photo by Josh Cheuse

May 30, 2013 12:00 pm

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! magazine

Belleville-area native and Son Volt frontman Jay Farrar has two releases this spring: the CD “Honky Tonk” and the memoir “Falling Cars and Junkyard Dogs,” an episodic account of his life and times … so far.

The book’s short, almost songlike organization lets readers connect a lot of the dots. Farrar talked about the book shortly before taking Son Volt out on its “Honky Tonk” tour.

Continue reading at stltoday.com