Monthly Archives: May 2013

Dave Alvin lives to tell about his ‘Justified’ stint

Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin. Photo by Beth Herzhaft
Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin. Photo by Beth Herzhaft

May 31, 2013 6:00 am

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! magazine

Singer-songwriter Dave Alvin appeared on the tough, violent TV drama “Justified” and lived to talk about it.

“I consider that a great achievement,” Alvin says with a chuckle.

He guest-starred as himself, fronting a band in a bar. And it didn’t hurt that “Justified” creator Graham Yost is a big Alvin fan who wanted to use Alvin’s music in the show to represent the inner voice of the lead character, U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant).

Alvin, who plays Off Broadway on Friday, has had four songs featured in the FX series: “Harlan County Line,” which he sang in the barroom scene in Season 2; “Every Night About This Time,” from deep in Alvin’s catalog; “Beautiful City Across the River,” written for the show; and “You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive,” a cover of a Darrell Scott song that closed the recent Season 4 finale.

Continue reading at stltoday.com

Son Volt frontman takes stock of his life with a memoir

Jay Farrar of Son Volt. Photo by Josh Cheuse
Jay Farrar of Son Volt. Photo by Josh Cheuse

May 30, 2013 12:00 pm

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! magazine

Belleville-area native and Son Volt frontman Jay Farrar has two releases this spring: the CD “Honky Tonk” and the memoir “Falling Cars and Junkyard Dogs,” an episodic account of his life and times … so far.

The book’s short, almost songlike organization lets readers connect a lot of the dots. Farrar talked about the book shortly before taking Son Volt out on its “Honky Tonk” tour.

Continue reading at stltoday.com

Son Volt brings new sounds to its music

Son Volt
Son Volt

May 30, 2013 12:00 pm

By Barry Gilbert
Special to Go! magazine

‘There’s a world of wisdom inside a fiddle tune,” Jay Farrar writes on the smart and evocative new Son Volt album “Honky Tonk,” a work that embraces the band’s early sound as well as that of classic country music.

Farrar hasn’t explored the fiddle and steel guitar vibe so extensively since “Windfall,” the first track on the first Son Volt album, “Trace,” in 1995. It’s a sound that was reinforced for Farrar over the past few years as he sat in with his brother Dade and new Son Volt player Gary Hunt in their St. Louis band Colonel Ford.

Farrar, a Metro East native and co-leader of the groundbreaking alt-country band Uncle Tupelo in the early ’90s, calls the fiddle a “transcendent instrument.”

“I wanted to explore the twin-fiddle sound, which is really something that speaks to me, and which I got to witness first-hand playing around town with Colonel Ford,” Farrar says. “It’s a powerful sound; it draws you in. There’s a natural chorus effect on the fiddle. The pitch is just a little bit off, and it’s an intriguing sound.”

Continue reading at stltoday.com